Watermelon Granita

Posted on
in Art & Design, Illustrated Recipes, Recipes

Illustration by Victoria Topping.

Watermelon Granita

Posted on
in Art & Design, Illustrated Recipes, Recipes

You can enjoy this refreshing, sweet, tangy, chilled beverage at any time of the day. To spice up this Watermelon Granita, add a couple of shots of gin, vodka or white rum to the mixture before you freeze it, or pour it over to serve. People have also been known to top granitas with a dollop of something creamy to mix through – some creme fraiche, ricotta or coconut cream.

Watermelon & mint granita

  • 4 cups watermelon cubes
  • 1/3 cup caster sugar
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • fresh mint leaves

Combine watermelon and lime juice in a blender and blend until smooth. Pour into a saucepan, add sugar and stir over a medium-high heat until sugar has dissolved. Remove from heat and allow to cool to room temperature. you can stir in some booze now if you are using it. Pour mixture into a large tin and place in the freezer for at least a few fours, until completely frozen.

Once frozen, use a fork to fluff scrap the granita. Spoon into glasses and top with fresh mint. Scrape fork across surface of granita to form ice shavings. Mound granita in glasses.

If you want to impress your granita eaters:

Granita (in Italian also granita siciliana) is a semi-frozen dessert made from sugar, water and various flavourings. Originally from Sicily, although available all over Italy (but granita in Sicily is somewhat different from the rest of Italy), it is related to sorbet and italian ice. However, in most of Sicily, it has a coarser, more crystalline texture. Food writer Jeffrey Steingarten says that “the desired texture seems to vary from city to city” on the island; on the west coast and in Palermo, it is at its chunkiest, and in the east it is nearly as smooth as sorbet. [1] This is largely the result of different freezing techniques: the smoother types are produced in a gelato machine, while the coarser varieties are frozen with only occasional agitation, then scraped or shaved to produce separated crystals. Although its texture varies from coarse to smooth, it is always different from the one of an ice cream which is creamier, and from the one of a sorbet, which is more compact; this makes granita distinct and unique.